Issue 3 Available Now

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Issue 3 of Sobotka Literary Magazine is available now at:

http://sobotkaliterarymagazine.bigcartel.com/product/issue-3

Sincerest thanks to everyone who was made this issue possible, especially the writers. We’re excited for people to read some amazing work. Feel lit in your bones!

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Wordsmith Wednesday: David Foster Wallace’s “Joseph Frank’s Dostoevsky”

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The Wordsmith Wednesday this week comes from David Foster Wallace’s essay “Joseph Frank’s Dostoevsky” from his book “Consider the Lobster.”

The words are:

“Am I a good person? Deep down, do I even really want to be a good person, or do I only want to seem like a good person so that people (including myself) will approve of me? Is there a difference? How do I ever actually know whether I’m bullshitting myself, morally speaking?”

This passage appears as an aside in an essay about a biography of Fyoder Dostoevsky, a piece filled with these self-aware inclusions that break the fourth wall. Wallace’s ability to tease out those little gnawing human questions in his writing and engage the reader in conversation is one of the main reasons I’m drawn to him and the above words express something that had been bouncing around in my brain for years before I saw them in print. Thanks to David Foster Wallace for putting words to feelings I think a lot of us have.

– NR

David Foster Wallace

Submissions for Issue 2

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Submissions for Issue 2 are open until December 28, 2014! We want your poetry/fiction/essay!

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Long Burning Logs

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Since we are asking people to share a bit of themselves with us through their work, we figured it was only fair to share a bit of ourselves. These are some stories that make us here at Sobotka burn, both as writers and readers.

Kathy:

“Teddy” by JD Salinger
“The Penal Colony” by Franz Kafka
“Man From the South” by Roald Dahl
“Puppy” by George Saunders
“How to Become a Writer Or, Have You Earned This Cliche” by Lorrie Moore

Nick:

“EPICAC” by Kurt Vonnegut
“Octet” by David Foster Wallace
“Indian Camp” by Ernest Hemingway
“The Overcoat” by Nikolai Gogol
“The Beggar and the Diamond” by Stephen King

Some stories burn bright, but their afterimage fades quickly. These stories have continued to glow in the backs of our heads long after the first read.

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